Beware Orivet Genetics and AnimalsDNA.com

This is one of the worst shopping experiences I have ever had, so I feel obligated to keep other people from making my mistake.

PLEASE avoid Orivet Genetics (AKA AnimalsDNA.com).

I wanted to see what one of our cat’s DNA looked like out of curiosity and after much research I found a company that claims to support breeders and individuals.

I’m honestly not sure how a breeder could work with them considering my one cat’s results have not been produced and I ordered it on February 18, 2014.

It is now August 12, 2014.

Below is the status of my test as of today.

—- DNA FINGERPRINT (PROFILE) – CAT Pending Tue, 18 Feb 2014

I searched my inbox and found 11 emails from the company since March 12 in reply to my questions about where my cat’s results are.

Each email promised my results in 1-2 weeks. Some even gave a specific date or day of the week.

Their emails contain excuses for the delay including :

  • they forgot (wow, really?)
  • that my several emails sat in Junk mail for a few weeks
  • that their email system was down for a long period of time
  • and that they had to “sit down” with their geneticist for a stern talking to.  That stern talking to happened June 27 and I have heard nothing since.

I was given 2 test results that I did not order as a consolation, but honestly I’m not sure if they even ran my cat’s sample to make those reports.

I imagine that falsifying cat DNA reports might be fairly easy by someone who knows how to do it, so I’m not even sure if the 2 reports I received are legitimate.

Please, please do not buy any DNA tests from this company. They have proven themselves to be both unprofessional and untrustworthy.

 

Living With and Without Cancer

This might end up being a post that I regularly update- I’m not sure yet.

“I’m not sure yet” pretty much sums up my life lately, both with and without cancer.

It’s almost mid August and I still mentally feel like it’s June (before I had my first cancer removal surgery). That’s weird. It’s weird that I still expect to celebrate my birthday and July 4th, and do all sorts of other summery things..but those have already passed.

I’m here, but I’m not here. That’s also strange. I’m here, but it’s not the me that was here before I had surgery. My entire body is different now.

I can’t even process alcohol the same way. I had 2 small drinks and thought I was dying the next day. I threw up all morning and in to the afternoon. That’s never happened in all my younger good-time-having years.

What worked for me to maintain my figure doesn’t work anymore now that I don’t have a thyroid.

I have developed a small protruding belly. I can’t run as fast as I used to be able to. I don’t feel as motivated to lose the weight because nothing I do seems to work.

I worry I’ll get to the point where I say “meh, I can’t get back to where I was- might as well have this big [soft pretzel/doughnut/piece of pizza/12 inch sub sandwhich]…” The old me would have turned my nose up at that junk.

I already ate well and watched my caloric intake before. I am swimming and running/walking on alternating days (or as weather permits). I wear my weight loss workout clothing, but I still can’t break through my post-op weight gain.

It’s only 4 to 5 pounds, but on my petite frame it sits right on my stomach, which is really irritating. I know, I know- I’m thankful to be alive-really. I just miss the old me, the body I worked hard for. The body that responded correctly to my input and exercise. I can’t figure out what to do to get back there, or if it’s even possible.

The scar on my collar bone makes planking uncomfortable, but I started again today anyway.

My doctor told me I was eating too few calories for a post-op healing body (at 1,000-1300 a day, which is what I was eating before surgery). but I can’t eat more. My stomach is much smaller than it used to be a few years ago.

I’m sick, but I’m not sick. I look fine, except for my scar. I’m struggling at work to keep up with my projects and not be the weakest member of the team. I’ve never been weak and inefficient, but I am now.

I have to ask for help, I have to turn down projects, I have to explain to coworkers from other teams who don’t know me and get frustrated with my work that “hey, I’m normally not this stupid/inefficient/inept at my job but I was diagnosed with cancer this summer and I’m trying my best to keep up-I’m sorry.”

Asking for understanding and forgiveness from others puts me at a disadvantage- it makes me look weak. They’re nicer to me and more understanding afterward I talk to them about it, but I don’t like being the weakest link. I feel like they feel sorry for me, and I hate that feeling.

Cancer has taken a lot of people I love from me in the past, and now it’s taken some things I loved about me away, too.

 

My septorhinoplasty and thyroidectomy

In the spring of 2014 I discovered that my thyroid cyst from last year turned into a tumor and was growing steadily.

I am at an air base in Japan on my husband’s military orders, so first I had to go off base to a Japanese hospital to have the needle aspiration biopsy done because the base hospital couldn’t provide this service.

The surgeon at Yokota still needed to examine me first and noticed that I had a severely damaged nose from an injury I received in kindergarten. A girl hit me over the head with her heavy 1990’s lunchbox complete with an old, heavy thermos and my nose has remained broken ever since. After he performed some initial breathing tests I was amazed at the difference that being unobstructed made and he agreed to revisit my nose problem after I had some more work on my thyroid done.

The second appointment was a consultation at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, about 2 hours one way by train. I had to visit the bi-lingual doctor, then the surgeon for the needle biopsy, then re-visit the first Japanese doctor so that I could get the results back in English. February and March were exhausting with the back and forth appointments.

The FNA (fine needle aspiration) here was an experience I’ll never forget because Japanese medicine doesn’t use anesthesia like American medicine does. The doctor looked at me and said “don’t breathe, don’t swallow, don’t talk”  before shoving he long, thin needle into the left side of my throat. The needle could have been short, for all I know-it just felt like it was a foot long. My brain had no time to register what happened, so the pain didn’t come until an hour later.

He gathered cells twice (he called the needle insertions “punches”) and that still only took 10 minutes; the same procedure took 45 minutes with anesthesia last year in America.

The FNA results came back clear for cellular cancer, but the doctors were concerned with what we couldn’t see so I was sent back to Yokota to biopsy the tumor itself.

Here is another difference between eastern and western medicine; the Japanese doctors did not want to remove any part of the thyroid and only wanted to only take the tumor, but all the American doctors wanted to take both the mass and half my left thyroid.

Now I was faced with the decision of the actual surgery. I received a referral to the naval base even farther south (about 3.5 hours by train one way) and it was the same process. A consultation, a return trip for the surgery, and a lengthy stay.

I was really frustrated with the idea that I would have to miss more work to go even further away so I emailed the ENT surgeon I first met at Yokota.

This was around late April and as it turns out my surgeon was set to leave Yokota Air Base in July, so that is why my referral was for the naval base. I was able to talk with the surgeon and get him to accept my surgery before he left- both of them, actually. We decided that he would do both the  septorhinoplasty and thyroidectomy at the same time. The  thyroidectomy took priority, of course, and would be the first procedure he would do for me.

My surgery was the morning of May 28, 2014 and this is the story of my surgery and recovery.

I have never had surgery before, except for having my wisdom teeth removed, so I was pretty anxious about being down for so many weeks.

Luckily all of our bills, deposits, and withdraws are automatic so I had nothing to worry about there. I highly suggest you put as much of your life on “auto pilot”  as possible, it will make your life so much easier.

I finished graduate school a few weeks ago, so I have no loose ends to tie there, either. I only had to get my work assignments and tasks set up so that I can easily have someone followup on my work.

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Wednesday after waking up from surgery

It took 3 times to get the IV into my arm, and my wrists have the bruises to prove it.

The last full day I remember is Tuesday, and that feels really weird to have lost so many days.

Immediately after the surgery I felt great, which really alarmed me because I wasn’t sure if that was the drugs, or if I really did feel okay. I was eating, walking, and sleeping relatively well. I had crackers that night, and the morning later was able to eat everything on my hospital tray.

The incision on my throat is fine, and I have minimal pain and discomfort. I can’t really put my head all the way back, but that’s no big deal.

My nose? That’s another story. I never expected the most painful and irritating of the two procedures would be my nose, even though I read about nose work beforehand and expected the itching. I’ve got both a nose cast on the outside and splints on the inside, and the itching is driving me crazy.

May 31 was the worst day for swelling so far because it felt like my nose was going to break my cast in two. I was able to get the swelling down with ice packs throughout the night. June 1 I was reduced to putting on gloves while I slept because I had been waking up scratching my nose and the rest of my body like crazy.

The next day I had to file my newly-grown nails down quite a bit just to avoid accidentally hurting myself. Benedryl isn’t dealing with the itching anymore, either, but luckily I had a prescription for itching already.

I’m taking my pain medicine on schedule, and have not needed to take the full dosage but a few times, so I’m happy with that.

Overall it feels like have serious sinus pressure and/or a cold because of the nose pressure, my need to carry around a Kleenex to catch drips, and having to sleep propped up at at angle so I can breathe.

The saline flushes 4 times a day has already become my least favorite thing to do during this whole recovery process.

By Sunday the bruising is starting to change colors from black to yellow. My nose cast comes off this coming Wednesday and I’m really excited about that.

I have had some light numbness on my left fingers since the surgery and have read that it might be a calcium deficiency, but I’ll wait for my doctor to monitor my thyroid levels to see what he thinks.

Wednesday 6/4

1 week post-op and I had the cast and splints removed today.

The ends of the splints are wider than my nostril is, so the initial pull was both painful and satisfying as it passed though. There there was the weird sensation of what felt like pulling spaghetti through my nose (that was the rest of the splint).

Then I had to experience that again on the other nostril. While it didn’t hurt enough to make me cry from pain, the pulling and tugging around my nose area made my eyes water and tears began to run down my cheeks.

Then the cast came off. I expected that to hurt worse than the splints, but the cast was no big deal. Immediately after everything removed I recognized how freely I could breath.

My doctor says that my recovery experience isn’t typical and that I am bouncing back earlier than most people do. Now this could just be him trying to make me feel good, but I wanted to mention it here since other people may have a harder time than I did.

I was cleared to go back to work as soon early as Friday and I will be back to scuba diving and will get to try sky diving in about 2 months post-op.

I asked about the light numbness in my fingers and he said that, considering I had 2 procedures that was about 4 hour long, that he thinks the tingle comes from how they position your hand tightly against your leg during the surgery and that the tingling sensation should go away in a few weeks.

While I know I am swollen, I see a big difference already- no crooked nose and no bump! And most importantly, I can breathe correctly!

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2 weeks post-op 6/11

Wednesday 6/11

Today marks 2 weeks post-op.

6/4 was the last day I used the pain medication, so I’ve been managing my pain very well. Most of the bruising is gone and I’m only left with some light yellowing on my cheek and the throat incision.

The numbness in my fingers is nearly gone and I’ve been able to crinkle my nose when I smile for the past few days, as well.

About 4 days ago I noticed a very strange droop/sag in both cheeks and I panicked.

It looked like I needed a facelift before I was 30. I emailed my doctor and he said it was likely just swelling and not to worry.

In the days since the swelling has indeed gone done and my cheeks are starting to look normal again.

I still have some swelling around my nose and cheeks and a little numbness on the tip of my nose, but I’m still breathing well and everything seems to be working out.

I did, however, get news yesterday that my biopsy results did come back positive for cancer.

The tumor had papillary thyroid cancer with a follicular variant. The doctors say that this is very treatable and My husband and I are staying positive and we both feel really going about it.

I’m scheduled for another surgery later this month to remove my right thyroid just to err on the side of caution. I’ll be on a thyroid supplement for the rest of my life, but it’s better than the alternative.

The other thyroid will be biopsied, as well, but it will be about another 2 weeks from the date of surgery to find out if they discovered any more cancerous tissue.

I will keep this post updated.

3 weeks, 2 days post-op

3 weeks, 2 days post-op

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Monday August 4

It’s August now and I’m recovering pretty well. The tip of my nose still feels pretty stiff, but it’s not painful or uncomfortable.

My second thyroid surgery was successful and I was told I am cancer free at the moment, so that’s great news. That scar is healing up nicely and I feel so much better without the cancer in my body.

I did end up gaining 4-6 pounds after the second surgery, but I am working on getting that under control. Sometimes a few pounds take more work to lose than double-digits.

Overall I’m glad to have had the procedures, even though surgery and recovery took up the majority of the summer. I’m having some trouble remembering that it is August already because it still feels like the beginning of summer for me.

I hope writing about my experience can help someone who is looking to have either of these procedures done!

If you’re about to have one of these operations done-stay strong. Wishing you a smooth surgery and recovery.

Challenge: Choose Only 2 Things That Represent Japan

Yesterday a Japanese person asked me what 2 things I would pick that best represent [my impression of] Japan.

I found this to be a difficult question because so far I love everything about it.

Choosing just 2 aspects of life in Japan was very challenging, but after some thought I was able to pick 2 that best represent my experience here:

1. The Train System

I think that Japan’s train system is a metaphor for modern Japan culture.

I’ll often see women in kimono as they go to and from work, which is a reminder of how rich Japan’s culture is and how seamlessly the past blends with the present here. On the same city block you will see a mixture of old wooden homes alongside modern structures, so the blending of past and present is something you will instantly be aware of.

The trains are efficient, on time, and reliable. The signs are in English, which shows how willing the Japanese people are to accommodate travelers who speak other languages. The station is packed with delicious smells and foods, gifts, convenience store items, grocery stores, and sometimes even department stores, so you’re never at a loss for something to buy that you need or want.

The passengers are quiet, respectful, and keep to themselves. I find that the majority of people follow the established rules of the train system:stand on the left of the escalator and walk on the right, no talking on your phone in the train, move quickly, and don’t stop the flow of traffic. To me, this behavior shows how disciplined, respectful, and orderly the Japanese are- and I love it.

Then you have those passengers who sleep on the train. Many Americans I know think this is very funny (for some strange reason), but I think that these sleeping people represent the long work day and diligent work ethic that Japan culture celebrates.

2. Gadgets That Make Your Life Easier

Japanese gadgets never cease to amaze me. Every time I see a new one it makes perfect sense and I wonder why I haven’t seen it before now. I think that Japanese gadgets (for the kitchen, organization, storage, bathroom, and the like) are a perfect example of the efficiency and ingenuity of the Japanese culture. These products exist because there was a need that wasn’t being filled. Sure, there are some products out there that are probably useless, but there hasn’t been a single product I’ve bought that hasn’t helped make my daily life easier.

If you had to choose 2 things that best represent your impression of Japan, what would they be?

Manicures For Short Stubby Nails

If you found this, then you probably have the same problem I do- short, stubby nails (and in my case hands, too).

I was blessed with terrible hand genes. My hands are tiny and my nail beds are wider than they are short (think “squatty”).

This makes my nails look short and unattractive. I also pick my nails and cuticles due to stress.

Lately I decided that, unless by some miracle of cosmetic science they discover a way to completely replace your fingernails (or even give me robot fingernails- that would be cool), then I’m stuck with these stubs.

I started googling it and discovered that, to my dismay, I’m pretty much out of luck. I’ve tried the hair and nail vitamins, I’ve tried acrylic nails (they destroy my real nails), and I’ve tried the Sally Hansen pink nail growth polish (I’m allergic to it).

Nothing seems to help. My nails are brittle, snag easily, and grow out strangely- they’re still wider than they are long and the nailtip is very flimsy.

Yesterday I decided that I was going to try to do something about it. I was going to try to embrace my nails since I’m stuck with them.

If you also have short, stubby nails, fear not. Think like an artist and use illusion to add length while you try to grow your nails out.

Here’s the steps:

1. Apply a basecoat

2. Find a design

3. Draw!

4. Spray your nails with hairspray from several inches away- too close and the Sharpie will smear.

5. Wait until the hairspray is completely try, then apply a thick topcoat. A thinner topcoat made my Sharpie design smear.

6. Do not clip your nails, file them. Clipping damages nails like ours.

 

1. I opted to buy a light nude color as a basecoat. I found Covergirl’s Outlast in “Forever Frosted” # 115. I’m very fair, so this color matches my skin tone.

At this point I have to say that I am incredibly inexperienced with painting my nails, considering I have never cared about them before. My paint jobs are always uneven, so I usually opt for a glittery or frosted polish because they seem to be forgiving.

Protip: if you don’t paint all the way to the edge of your nails and nail bed it will make your nails look a little longer. It won’t magically give you longer nails, but hopefully the results will be better than what you expected.

Use a small paintbrush dipped in nail polish remover to “cut in” around the edge of your nails. I also read drawing around the edges with Elmer’s white glue works, but I haven’t tried it yet.

I didn’t even even have nail polish remover (I told you I never cared about my nails before!) so I just tried to leave that gap around each nail by hand.

2. I started thinking about art and illusion. Vertical lines help lengthen the body, and patterns help hide imperfections.

I’m too cheap to go to the nail salon and I’m too embarrassed of my stubs to go if I wasn’t cheap, so I started researching something I had seen on Pinterest- Sharpie manicures. Here’s another great site for ideas.

I LOVE Sharpies. For our first Valentine’s day as a married couple I asked for Sharpies- and I still have most of them. That was 9 years ago, so they last a while.

Then I picked a color I liked- I’m really into teal and turquoise. image (1)

3. I just started dotting. Heavy dots, and light dots, in quick movements. The best part is that the Sharpie comes off with rubbing alcohol, so if you mess up or if you’re a perfectionist like me you can just take it off and try again.

I’m happy with it and I hope that it will encourage me to let me nails grow, stop picking my cuticles, and embrace what nature gave me.

4. Spray your nails with hairspray from several inches away and let them dry completely.

I discovered step 4 after trial and error. If you apply the topcoat without this step the Sharpie will smear (or at least it did for me)

5.  Add your topcoat. Also discovered through trial and error- if you use a thin layer of topcoat you risk more smearing. I used a thick layer and even then a few of the dots smeared to streaks. The picture above was taken before I added the topcoat.

6. Never clip your nails, file them instead. I read several articles that talked about how clipping short nails like ours causes more damage to our already delicate nails. File them lightly to shape them.

Tokyo Sakura (Cherry) Blossom Season 2014

We just experienced our first Sakura (cherry) blossom season here in Tokyo and it was more beautiful than we expected.

While we didn’t get to see every hanami (Sakura viewing) spot we wanted to see because of our very limited free time (David now works 12 hour shifts overnight), were still able to enjoy Hanami at a few places.

Sakura at Yokota AB

Sakura at Yokota AB

The Sakura near where we live on the base in Fussa are already bare from the high winds we’ve gotten lately, but I have enjoyed riding my bike through the falling petals as I run errands around the local area.

I work at an English cafe in Hamura on the weekends David works and the owner has become a good friend to us. He is a widower and has tried to go on local bus tours by himself, but going alone just isn’t the same as going with friends or loved ones, so when he asked if we would be interested in going with him we were very excited.

The bus tour Ken-San booked for us was a Sakura tour around Tokyo that included all-you-can-eat tempura and sushi for lunch.

The locations we stopped at were:

  • Tokyo National Museum
  • Yasukuni Shrine and (matsuri) festival in the area before the shrine
  • Shiratama Inari Shrine and Hotel Chinzanso (a popular outdoor wedding area with a waterfall and hidden restaurants and shrines along the paths on the hillside behind the hotel

Ken-San did an excellent job of telling us about the places we visited because the entire tour was in Japanese. We learned many new things and visited places we wouldn’t have discovered on our own. The tour was rushed, though, because traffic caused us to get behind, which meant our time at the locations was cut short.

Yasukuni Shrine

The standard Sakura at Yasukuni Shrine

Hotel Chinzanso

Hotel Chinzanso

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think my favorite Hanami was when we actually had the time to take a picnic lunch and relax under the Sakura by the Tama river in Hamura. We stumbled upon a small matsuri (festival) and I tried some fried uncooked spaghetti that was covered in sugar. I don’t know the name of it, but the booth was very popular so I decided to try some. It was good, but very messy. There was powered sugar everywhere!

Lanterns lined the path around this section of the Tama river, and this particular spot felt very dreamlike to us.

Hamura Sakura Festival

Hamura Sakura Festival

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Humura Sakura Festival at Sunset

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Hamura Sakura Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We went back to Ueno Park to see the nighttime Hanami, and we were delighted to see so many Japanese people relaxing, drinking, and having a great time with their friends and co-workers.

Next year David plans to take leave so he will be able to enjoy the Sakura during the day.  I certainly look forward to next year’s Sakura blossoms!

Do you have a favorite Sakura viewing spot?

10 Handy Products From The 100 Yen Store

Recently I read another blogger’s roundup of his 10 favorite handy items from the 100 yen store, so I thought I would do my own.

There are a few different 100 yen store chains, but all of these gems are from the Daiso.

Think of the Daiso as a Dollar General that has higher quality items that you can actually use for a long time.

For the most part I agreed with the author, but I found 10 more must-haves.

1. Melamine Sponges (aka Magic Erasers)

Here you can buy a bag full of melamine sponges in a variety of shapes and sizes. I’ll never buy an overpriced Magic Eraser again!

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2. Wood scratch filler markerIMG_5713

Not only did I finally find a marker to match my espresso-finished furniture, it works like a dream and was dirt cheap compared to American home stores. This came in handy for both the scratches that our furniture endured during its journey here to Japan, and for scratches that had been there for years.

3. Rice washer and rice paddle holder

Washing rice is a breeze now that we found this washer/strainer, and our rice paddle is easy to reach.

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4. Hard Boiled Egg Punch

Use this tool to punch holes in the bottom of hard boiled eggs before boiling to make them easier to peel. It’s magnetic so you can stick it to the fridge when you’re not using it.

5. Sweater Fuzz Remover Tool

This handheld battery operated sweater fuzz remover is powerful and effective. I have never bought one before simply because they’re too expensive for me- I’m super thrify. For 100 yen this was definitely a must-have!

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6. Spray bottles and pump bottlesIMG_5903

This is the most effective spray bottle I’ve ever bought anywhere- it has a strong sprayer and  trigger. The pump bottles come in many sizes and are great for dish soap and shampoo.

7. Pantry and closet lights

I found both wired and wireless setups. Start a video recording on your phone, put it in the closet, and shut the door to make sure you’ve got the positive and negative magnets positioned correctly.

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8. Gifts for those back homeIMG_5717

The 100 yen stores are perfect for gifts to send loved ones back home. This is just 1 of the aisles full of Hello Kitty products.

9. Counter Top Storage

These glass counter canisters work great for holding tea.

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10. Bathroom storageIMG_5904

Most homes are small here, so making best use of your space is critical. We found these dish soap holders and use them for toiletries, instead. This suction cup office pencil holder doubles as a toothbrush holder.

We were also able to use these same items to mount our WiMax adapter to the sliding glass window for better reception. No fiber- I know. It’s terrible, and the internet options on the military base are equally awful-trust me.

So, what are your favorite 100 yen store products?